Navigating the Intersection of Ethical Principles and Competing Interests: Achieving Harmonious Symbiosis Between Academic Integrity and AI Integration in Assessment for Coding Subjects

Navigating the Intersection of Ethical Principles and Competing Interests: Achieving Harmonious Symbiosis Between Academic Integrity and AI Integration in Assessment for Coding Subjects

Digital Posters AAIN 2023 Conference

Navigating the Intersection of Ethical Principles and Competing Interests: Achieving Harmonious Symbiosis Between Academic Integrity and AI Integration in Assessment for Coding Subjects

Regina John Luan
Lecturer, Central Queensland University

The integration of artificial intelligence (AI) into higher education assessment for coding subjects has the potential to enhance student engagement and success. However, there are also concerns about the potential for AI to be used to facilitate academic dishonesty. This study explores the use of AI in assessment tasks in a higher education landscape, particularly when it comes to challenging subjects such as coding. It examines how AI-enhanced assessment tasks could help to increase student engagement and motivation, while also identifying areas where students need additional support. The study also discusses the challenges and opportunities associated with the use of AI in assessment, with a particular focus on academic integrity.
The findings of the study suggest that AI-enhanced assessment tasks can be a valuable tool for improving student learning in coding courses. However, careful planning and implementation are essential to ensure that AI is used effectively and ethically. Specifically, it is recommended that AI-enhanced assessment tasks be designed to be aligned with the learning objectives of the course and to be resistant to plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty. It is also recommended that students be given the opportunity to provide feedback on the AI- enhanced assessment tasks. This feedback can be used to improve the design of the tasks and to ensure that they are meeting the needs of the students.
These findings have the potential to guide the creation and application of AI-augmented assessment tasks across diverse higher education courses. Nevertheless, it’s important to acknowledge that the use of AI in assessments is a multifaceted matter lacking simple solutions. Both potential advantages and risks are linked with AI’s adoption, demanding careful deliberation of these aspects when deciding on its utilization.

Discussion starters:
  • How can higher education institutions ensure that AI-enhanced assessment tasks are used in an ethical and responsible manner, and that they do not facilitate academic dishonesty?
  • What are some specific strategies that can be used to prevent plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty in AI- enhanced assessment tasks?
  • How can AI-enhanced assessment tasks be designed to be fair and equitable for all students, regardless of their background or circumstances?
  • How can AI-enhanced assessment tasks be used to promote inclusivity and accommodate diverse learning styles and needs?

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Incentivizing academic integrity through the use of ‘ownership and integrity’ marks in an assessment rubric in nursing students

Incentivizing academic integrity through the use of ‘ownership and integrity’ marks in an assessment rubric in nursing students

Digital Posters AAIN 2023 Conference

Incentivizing academic integrity through the use of ‘ownership and integrity’ marks in an assessment rubric in nursing students

Joan Lynch
Director of Academic Program, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Western Sydney University
Caroline Lunt, Suzanne D’Souza, Asiye Kopan

Assessments support learning and frame how and what students learn. It also plays a central role in the certification of student nurses which is important to determine if  students have  the requisite knowledge and skills to become Registered Nurses. The inclusion of rubrics in assessments communicate expectations of assessments to students. A rubric can prompt students to address certain aspects of an assessment task they may not have thought to, and in this regard are a significant point of enactment. They also act as an invitation for students to work with the assessment criteria to understand how to complete the assessment task.

When preparing written assessment students are expected to undertake several actions to support their learning such as literature searching that uses nursing databases, reading published, current, peer reviewed evidence-based sources, paraphrasing this information, and attribute this work through correct citation practices.  However, these good academic behaviours are being challenged by the ease of access to a plethora of low-quality electronic information available via search engines such as Google, contract cheating services and more recently Generative AI. When students use these low-quality information sources to complete assessments their learning and potentially their integrity is jeopardised.

This project aims to espouse behaviours associated with academic success and integrity by rewarding them through the allocation of “ownership and integrity” marks in the assessment rubric. Marks were awarded for using robust literature searching methods, similarity index (from Turnitin) <15% and correct citation for at least 6 academic sources.

Discussion starters:
  • Does allocating marks for a specific Turnitin percentage have the potential to encourage inappropriate use of paraphrasing tools or generative AI?

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Acknowledgement to Country

The AAIN recognises the First Peoples of our nations and their ongoing connection to culture and country. We acknowledge First Nations Peoples of our lands as the Traditional Owners, Custodians and Lore Keepers and pay respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

Building Cultures of Integrity in Higher Education

Building Cultures of Integrity in Higher Education

Digital Posters AAIN 2023 Conference

Building Cultures of Integrity in Higher Education

Maryam Mariya
Senior Tutor/ Centre for Tertiary Teaching and Learning, University of Waikato

Katherine Gilliver-Brown – Senior Tutor/ University of Waikato
Rachel Fulton – Student Discipline Manager/ University of Waikato

Fostering cultures of integrity (Stephens, 2019, p. 9) presents complex challenges for universities. This video and poster presentation looks to explain the systemic barriers that tertiary institutions face in combating integrity issues and outlines some ideas or strategies for universities to build cultures of integrity and attract investment from all levels of stakeholders in an institution-wide top-down and bottom-up enduring campaign. It outlines an integrity culture change framework demonstrated by one of the Academic Integrity modules at the University of Waikato. Critical first steps involve initially assessing the current climate and gaining leadership resourcing and commitment. At the students’ level, we envisage integrating academic integrity activities such as the Academic Integrity modules, targeted orientations and workshops, and an academic integrity board game. To involve students in understanding academic integrity, we can do interactive activities like poster or video competitions, talks that engage students in discussion, opportunities for self-reflection on values, and practices that encourage a commitment to ethical behaviour. At the stakeholder level it is important to establish an enduring integrity culture that requires pairing top-down policy with ground-up educational practices while addressing reluctance to report violations. It demands framing integrity as integral to learning and encouraging sustained commitment institution-wide.
Discussion starters:
  • What activities successfully engage students in integrity culture-building?
  • How might assessment redesign promote academic integrity?
  • What barriers have you encountered when trying to establish integrity cultures?

Watch this AAIN Poster presentation, and engage with the authors and other attendees: you can post comments and questions on the Padlet that is provided for each poster. And on the day of the Forum, you will be able to continue the discussion with a live session with the authors.

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The Network acknowledges the support of Deakin University in developing and hosting this website.

Acknowledgement to Country

The AAIN recognises the First Peoples of our nations and their ongoing connection to culture and country. We acknowledge First Nations Peoples of our lands as the Traditional Owners, Custodians and Lore Keepers and pay respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

Two degrees of separation: Student Success & Programmatic Approaches

Two degrees of separation: Student Success & Programmatic Approaches

Digital Posters AAIN 2023 Conference

Two degrees of separation: Student Success & Programmatic Approaches

Martin McMorrow
Learning Co-ordinator, The University of Notre Dame
The Student Success unit identified the need for discipline integrated approaches to educate students in developing academic skills to uphold academic integrity. In response a short video format was developed, designed to be embedded in the learning management system (LMS) with assessment and course specificity. This example takes students through a step-by-step approach to note-taking and summary writing drawing on texts and topics similar to those students will need to draw on in their assessment. The format has proven to be a good base model that can and has been readily adapted to different disciplines and writing genres.
Discussion starters:
  • Does this ‘two degrees of separation’ approach provide clarity for students and support the skills required in their assessments?
  • Is it an effective way of helping first-year students to respect academic integrity in their writing?
  • How can its effectiveness be measured?

Watch this AAIN Poster presentation, and engage with the authors and other attendees: you can post comments and questions on the Padlet that is provided for each poster. And on the day of the Forum, you will be able to continue the discussion with a live session with the authors.

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The Network acknowledges the support of Deakin University in developing and hosting this website.

Acknowledgement to Country

The AAIN recognises the First Peoples of our nations and their ongoing connection to culture and country. We acknowledge First Nations Peoples of our lands as the Traditional Owners, Custodians and Lore Keepers and pay respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

Cheating AI with Creativity: Reinventing Assessments for the Digital Age

Cheating AI with Creativity: Reinventing Assessments for the Digital Age

Digital Posters AAIN 2023 Conference

Cheating AI with Creativity: Reinventing Assessments for the Digital Age

Dr Nici Sweaney
Manager, Education Quality and Excellence

In conjunction with Queensland University of Technology

In the face of changing higher education dynamics and advancing technology, traditional assessment methods are frequently questioned for their relevance and effectiveness. My aim was to innovate assessment design, foster student engagement, and importantly, deter AI-assisted cheating. I put this into practice in a large first-year course at ANU, transforming a typical 2500-word essay into a dynamic group multimedia project addressing environmental issues.

This innovative change was more than a shift in format; it was a strategy to cultivate vital 21st-century skills: critical thinking, collaboration, creativity, and communication. To boost team cohesion, I introduced a unique group-forming exercise – ’36 Questions to Fall in Love’ – which resulted in statistically significant improvements in feelings of connection and closeness among team members, particularly for female and minority group students.

The new assessment approach received overwhelmingly positive feedback from students, enriching their learning experience and improving team dynamics. This experience underscores the potential of such creative, collaborative assessment designs in promoting active learning while minimising opportunities for AI-aided dishonesty.

The practice invites further exploration and adaptation in diverse educational contexts and offers valuable lessons for educators aiming to maintain meaningful, relevant assessment methods resilient to academic integrity breaches in the digital age.

Discussion starters:
  • In the context of rapidly advancing technology, how can we continue to innovate assessment design to deter AI-assisted cheating and enhance learning?
  • What potential challenges or resistance might you anticipate when transitioning traditional assessments to more interactive, multimedia projects in your context? How could these be addressed?
  • How can we use innovative methods to foster connection and collaboration among students in large cohorts, particularly in the increasingly digital landscape of higher education?

Watch this AAIN Poster presentation, and engage with the authors and other attendees: you can post comments and questions on the Padlet that is provided for each poster. And on the day of the Forum, you will be able to continue the discussion with a live session with the authors.

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Acknowledgement to Country

The AAIN recognises the First Peoples of our nations and their ongoing connection to culture and country. We acknowledge First Nations Peoples of our lands as the Traditional Owners, Custodians and Lore Keepers and pay respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

Swipe right to report academic misconduct

Swipe right to report academic misconduct

Digital Posters AAIN 2023 Conference

Swipe right to report academic misconduct

Note: This video has no voice over.

Dr Jen Tindale
Senior Lecturer, Learning Futures, Western Sydney University

Sandy Noakes, Lynn Berry, Elen Seymour, Joan Lynch, Fidelis Mashiri, Zhao Zou
Western Sydney University

This poster presents preliminary findings from an applied research project designed to build staff and institutional capacity through recommendations, strategies and good practice examples of detection and reporting of academic misconduct. Findings are based on qualitative comments from an online survey of academic misconduct reporting practices in different text and non-text-based disciplines, in different schools within an Australian University. Findings are being examined with reference to a desktop audit of academic misconduct reporting processes, forms and staff resources; benchmarking against public information on processes and resources from other universities; and descriptions of activity in higher education standards and awards.
Survey participants included academic and professional staff involved in detecting, reporting and managing academic misconduct. Based on preliminary analysis, a framework has been developed to show the multi-layered and interdependent nature of influences on detecting and reporting activity to be considered when building individual and institutional capacity. Project outcomes will inform misconduct detection and reporting processes and procedures, to help close the loop on policy and practice. Outcomes will also inform the design and development of staff resources, alternative assessment tasks and student resources that support institutional compliance with TEQSA guidance and the Higher Education Standards Framework (Threshold Standards) 2021.

Discussion starters:
  • Is misconduct detection and reporting included in institution or faculty workplan policies?
  • Is misconduct detection and reporting defined as teaching-related activity, or is considered to be part of administration, governance or quality assurance?
  • To what extent is misconduct detection and reporting acknowledged, valued and recognised within institutions and more broadly across the sector?
  • What is the impact of misconduct detection and reporting? How do we measure it? What is the evidence of impact?

Watch this AAIN Poster presentation, and engage with the authors and other attendees: you can post comments and questions on the Padlet that is provided for each poster. And on the day of the Forum, you will be able to continue the discussion with a live session with the authors.

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The Network acknowledges the support of Deakin University in developing and hosting this website.

Acknowledgement to Country

The AAIN recognises the First Peoples of our nations and their ongoing connection to culture and country. We acknowledge First Nations Peoples of our lands as the Traditional Owners, Custodians and Lore Keepers and pay respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

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