Balancing Innovation and Integrity: embedding the ethical use gen-AI in course design

Balancing Innovation and Integrity: embedding the ethical use gen-AI in course design

Digital Posters AAIN 2023 Conference

Balancing Innovation and Integrity: embedding the ethical use gen-AI in course design

Kat Alchin
Learning Designer, The University of Adelaide

Richard McInnes, Georgia Forrest, Aaron Honson, Mark Carandang, Rosemarie Fonseka, Danielle Lemieux, Ajay Kulkarni.
Learning Enhancement and Innovation team, The University of Adelaide.

Background: Institutions have defined principles for gen-AI use through the lens of student academic integrity. Yet, there is a lack of clarity around ethical and best practice use for course design and development. The rapid growth of freely available gen-AI tools necessitates ethical and best-practice guidelines.
Aim: To develop a set of best-practice guidelines to ensure responsible use of gen-AI tools and establish consistent standards across the institution.
What was done and why: Third-space professionals applied ethical best-practice principles to use cases for gen-AI in course design and development. The guidelines were flexible, practical, not temporal–they need to apply to any current and future tools. They identified practical processes where or how gen-AI use might be appropriate in course development workflows.
Recommendations and Findings: A set of overarching principles were developed for gen-AI use in course design and development. Alongside the principles, a practical guide was developed for staff to understand how to best apply these principles within their own contexts. This guide enables staff to identify when and where work could be enhanced or made more efficient through the use of gen-AI, in line with best practice principles. These guidelines also help identify what gaps in policy or practice may exist so they can be addressed.

Discussion starters:
  • In your department or institution, how are staff supported to identify appropriate ways in which to implement, or in some cases, not to implement gen-AI into their course design and development workflows?
  • In your department or institution, do you feel that staff have clear pathways for knowledge sharing around the best practice use of gen-AI?
  • In your department or institution, do you feel that staff have clear pathways for reporting misuse of gen-AI within course design and development?

Watch this AAIN Poster presentation, and engage with the authors and other attendees: you can post comments and questions on the Padlet that is provided for each poster. And on the day of the Forum, you will be able to continue the discussion with a live session with the authors.

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Membership

The Network acknowledges the support of Deakin University in developing and hosting this website.

Acknowledgement to Country

The AAIN recognises the First Peoples of our nations and their ongoing connection to culture and country. We acknowledge First Nations Peoples of our lands as the Traditional Owners, Custodians and Lore Keepers and pay respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

A Unique Collegiate University Model for support and accountability in Academic Integrity

A Unique Collegiate University Model for support and accountability in Academic Integrity

Digital Posters AAIN 2023 Conference

A Unique Collegiate University Model for support and accountability in Academic Integrity

Dr Carolyn Alsen
Learning and Teaching Manager, University of Divinity

In the collegiate system of the University of Divinity, models of strategic governance and organisational are being implemented by Academic Board to create simplicity, transparency, a student focus and assurance of justice for staff, students and candidates alike. The models use hub and spoke metaphors, for the University entities to work both objectively and interdependently to share responsibility for the workload, and to create a community of practice. The poster will firstly explain the unique collegiate model at the University, then describe the operation of an Academic Integrity Hub which creates an independent, consistent, confidential and yet collegial approach to the support of students and candidates. Finally, the goal of the Hub is described as providing educational advice, advice on investigation of incidents, and monitoring trends in the institution and in the sector in academic integrity for Academic Board.
Discussion starters:
  • What are the emerging organisational models for strategic monitoring and maintenance of academic integrity in Universities?

Watch this AAIN Poster presentation, and engage with the authors and other attendees: you can post comments and questions on the Padlet that is provided for each poster. And on the day of the Forum, you will be able to continue the discussion with a live session with the authors.

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Membership

The Network acknowledges the support of Deakin University in developing and hosting this website.

Acknowledgement to Country

The AAIN recognises the First Peoples of our nations and their ongoing connection to culture and country. We acknowledge First Nations Peoples of our lands as the Traditional Owners, Custodians and Lore Keepers and pay respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

Assessment support strategies to minimise academic integrity breaches, while increasing student pass rates and reducing attrition

Assessment support strategies to minimise academic integrity breaches, while increasing student pass rates and reducing attrition

Digital Posters AAIN 2023 Conference

Assessment support strategies to minimise academic integrity breaches, while increasing student pass rates and reducing attrition

Rosemary Ayoub
Head Teacher Bachelor of Education (Birth to Five)

Student assessment support classes were used as the main strategy to increase the overall pass rates for students in the Bachelor of Education Early Childhood (Birth to Five) degree. These classes were offered for 1st year students and  timetabled in between lectures and tutorials  staffed by academic and literacy support staff. They were used as a strategy to monitor student attendance, submission, and literacy levels. Targeted support was provided based on initial literacy screening. The academic checked-in with each student about the progress of assessments and provided acceptable support. Additionally, it gave an opportunity for the academic to monitor ongoing work student’s ongoing work on an assessment and have the assurance of the final submission as student’s own work. The results achieved included a 19% increase in the pass rate and a 20% reduction in attrition. The occurrence of academic integrity breaches reduced by 50%. The sessions were also used to discuss appropriate uses of AI to support learning and to regularly remind students of the inappropriate uses of AI.

Discussion starters:
  • What types of academic support do you provide for students?
  • What guidance do your academics give around acceptable use of AI

Watch this AAIN Poster presentation, and engage with the authors and other attendees: you can post comments and questions on the Padlet that is provided for each poster. And on the day of the Forum, you will be able to continue the discussion with a live session with the authors.

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Membership

The Network acknowledges the support of Deakin University in developing and hosting this website.

Acknowledgement to Country

The AAIN recognises the First Peoples of our nations and their ongoing connection to culture and country. We acknowledge First Nations Peoples of our lands as the Traditional Owners, Custodians and Lore Keepers and pay respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

Fostering Academic Integrity through Peer Mentoring Programs: An Examination of On-Campus ‘Influencers’ and ‘Intervenors’ at Griffith College

Fostering Academic Integrity through Peer Mentoring Programs: An Examination of On-Campus ‘Influencers’ and ‘Intervenors’ at Griffith College

Digital Posters AAIN 2023 Conference

Fostering Academic Integrity through Peer Mentoring Programs: An Examination of On-Campus ‘Influencers’ and ‘Intervenors’ at Griffith College

Inez Chai
Student Success and Retention Co-ordinator, Griffith College
Karen McRae, Manager Academic Education, Navitas Pty Ltd
This roundtable discussion critically examines the impact of Griffith College’s peer mentoring programs, namely Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) and Mates, on academic integrity. These programs are designed to cultivate a supportive atmosphere, instil a sense of responsibility in students, and develop essential work-ready skills. Empirical evidence indicates that learning environments fostering a strong sense of belonging are associated with a reduction in academic misconduct (Fudge et. al., 2022).

The primary focus of this discussion centres on the innovative Mates program, which engages students in the Student Liaison Committee (SLC), and functions as a feedback mechanism, facilitating continuous improvement in enhancing academic integrity throughout the campus, whilst serving as a vital connection point with students. Insights gained from interviews with mentors reveal that students in leadership positions acting as role models exhibit a heightened sense of responsibility towards academic integrity, which permeates through their peers, with Mates acting as influencers and PALs as intervenors.

Thus far, research findings underscore the pivotal role of student partnership and peer mentoring programs in fostering academic integrity among students. Attendees will gain invaluable insights on the transformative potential of peer influence and mentorship, and its positive influence on student behaviour and attitudes towards academic integrity.

Discussion starters:
  • How can institutions further enhance peer mentoring programs to maximise their impact on academic integrity?
  • Are there any challenges in implementing such programs, and how can they be overcome?
  • What other strategies can be combined with student partnership and peer mentoring to create a more comprehensive approach to promoting academic integrity on campus?

Watch this AAIN Poster presentation, and engage with the authors and other attendees: you can post comments and questions on the Padlet that is provided for each poster. And on the day of the Forum, you will be able to continue the discussion with a live session with the authors.

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Membership

The Network acknowledges the support of Deakin University in developing and hosting this website.

Acknowledgement to Country

The AAIN recognises the First Peoples of our nations and their ongoing connection to culture and country. We acknowledge First Nations Peoples of our lands as the Traditional Owners, Custodians and Lore Keepers and pay respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

Academic integrity serious game:  The role of professional values

Academic integrity serious game: The role of professional values

Digital Posters AAIN 2023 Conference

Academic integrity serious game: The role of professional values

Laura Creighton
Lecturer (Education) Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK
Professor Christine Brown Wilson, Dr. Gary Mitchell, Conor Hamilton School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK and Associate Professor Christine Slade, Institute of Teaching and Learning Innovation, University of Queensland, Australia
Academic integrity is a fundamental pillar of academia internationally. Dishonest behaviour is of particular concern to degrees that prepare students for professional practice such as nursing. Universities need to take a proactive approach to preparing undergraduate students to balance their university academic workload, alongside other pressures such as work-integrated learning. An educational approach to promoting good academic practice is essential early in programmes of study. This is of relevance to nursing where students enter the workplace in the first year of study. Therefore, this study co-designed and evaluated a serious game with first year students in a Northern Ireland university, that promoted academic integrity in line with disciplinary professional values.
The game enables students to engage with scenarios, quizzes and resources on professionalism, academic offences, study skills and feedback.
The evaluation used a mixed-methods methodology that included a learning questionnaire (MLSQ)(n=233), followed by focus groups (n=39) with first year undergraduate nursing students. The serious academic integrity game significantly improved students’ motivation to learn about academic integrity. Further, students articulated how they were able to make the link between professional values and academic integrity after playing the game.
Discussion starters:
  • This serious game on academic integrity is transferable from the profession of nursing to other disciplines. What would be the benefit of a similar serious game in your discipline?
  • What is the link between professional aspects of your discipline and academic integrity?
  • Would a serious game be a method of education you could use in your discipline/ university? If so, what year group would you use it with?

Watch this AAIN Poster presentation, and engage with the authors and other attendees: you can post comments and questions on the Padlet that is provided for each poster. And on the day of the Forum, you will be able to continue the discussion with a live session with the authors.

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1 + 7 =

Membership

The Network acknowledges the support of Deakin University in developing and hosting this website.

Acknowledgement to Country

The AAIN recognises the First Peoples of our nations and their ongoing connection to culture and country. We acknowledge First Nations Peoples of our lands as the Traditional Owners, Custodians and Lore Keepers and pay respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

Academic Integrity Awareness Week: Student Leaders at the Forefront

Academic Integrity Awareness Week: Student Leaders at the Forefront

Digital Posters AAIN 2023 Conference

Academic Integrity Awareness Week: Student Leaders at the Forefront

Claudia Gottwald
Academic Integrity Skills Officer, The University of Adelaide

This submission highlights the crucial role of a volunteer group of Student Leaders, the Academic Integrity Ambassadors, in driving Academic Integrity Awareness Week at The University of Adelaide. The event, held as part of the university’s commitment to fostering a culture of academic integrity, featured a range of engaging activities and initiatives.
Student Leaders played a pivotal role in organising a dynamic launch event with a student-led workshop, interactive Pop-Up stalls with games and an engaging online quiz. Additionally, they successfully utilised social media to reach and engage students across the campus community.
An essential aspect of the event’s success was the collaborative effort between staff and students in planning and supporting Academic Integrity Awareness Week. A staff-student planning workshop with a student panel, named “IntegriTea,” facilitated productive discussions, further enhancing the impact of the week-long event.
This digital poster presentation celebrates the impact of Student Leaders at the forefront of Academic Integrity Awareness Week and emphasises the importance of ongoing staff-student collaboration in upholding ethical standards. It will be of interest to those looking for practical ways to work together to bring key academic integrity awareness messages to a broad cohort of students.

Discussion starters:
  • How can we further empower and support Student Leaders in their role as advocates for academic integrity throughout the year, beyond such an event?
  • Reflect on opportunities at our institution to organise similar events? What would you need to consider/adapt for your context?
  • In what ways can universities collaborate more effectively with Student Leaders as active partners?

Watch this AAIN Poster presentation, and engage with the authors and other attendees: you can post comments and questions on the Padlet that is provided for each poster. And on the day of the Forum, you will be able to continue the discussion with a live session with the authors.

Padlet
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Please get in touch if you have anything to ask or say about the AAIN.
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14 + 4 =

Membership

The Network acknowledges the support of Deakin University in developing and hosting this website.

Acknowledgement to Country

The AAIN recognises the First Peoples of our nations and their ongoing connection to culture and country. We acknowledge First Nations Peoples of our lands as the Traditional Owners, Custodians and Lore Keepers and pay respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

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